Books Received


March 2017


To the Cross: Proclaiming the Gospel from the Upper Room to Calvary 

By Christopher J. H. Wright

From the publisher:

The cross is good news for us today.

With the expertise of a veteran biblical scholar and the wisdom of a seasoned pastor, Christopher Wright skillfully guides us on Jesus’ journey from the Last Supper to the cross. Through the lens of the Old Testament, Wright navigates the Gospel accounts of events that include the meal in the upper room, Peter’s denials, the taunts and jeers of soldiers and bystanders, and the anguish of crucifixion, inviting us to meditate on their significance for us.

Jesus’ death on the cross offers us the forgiveness that Jesus prayed for, and through his resurrection we can know redemption. This is good news!

Adapted from sermons Wright preached at All Souls Church in London, these chapters are perfect for personal study and reflection. The book includes an appendix for pastors preparing to teach and preach on these passages, offering insight on sermon preparation as well as helpful commentary.

Evangelical, Sacramental, and Pentecostal: Why the Church Should Be All Three
by Gordon T. Smith

Evangelical. Sacramental. Pentecostal.

Christian communities tend to identify with one of these labels over the other two. Evangelical churches emphasize the importance of Scripture and preaching. Sacramental churches emphasize the importance of the eucharistic table. And pentecostal churches emphasize the immediate presence and power of the Holy Spirit. But must we choose between them? Could the church be all three?

Drawing on his reading of the New Testament, the witness of Christian history, and years of experience in Christian ministry and leadership, Gordon T. Smith argues that the church not only can be all three, but in fact must be all three in order to truly be the church. As the church navigates the unique global challenges of pluralism, secularism, and fundamentalism, the need for an integrated vision of the community as evangelical, sacramental, and pentecostal becomes ever more pressing. If Jesus and the apostles saw no tension between these characteristics, why should we?